ICE CREAM NATION © 2020. While it arguably might be true that in space, no-one can hear you scream ice cream, people do eat ice cream in space! Can you guess which flavour? While it arguably might be true that “in space, no-one can hear you scream ice cream”, people do eat ice cream in space! But the iconic “Astronaut ice cream” was actually only used once, in 1968. Ice Cream Nation is devoted to ice cream and related frozen desserts in all its fascinating forms and variations. In October 2012, Commander Sunita Williams of the International Space Station (ISS) even made a special point about how much the crew was looking forward to enjoying the ice cream that just had arrived by capsule (Blue Bell’s vanilla with swirled chocolate sauce, by the way). So, following that first appearance in space, freeze-dried ice cream has basically only been consumed back here on Mother Earth. The ice cream was carried in GLACIER (General Laboratory Active Cryogenic ISS Experiment Refrigerator), designed to preserve science samples on the return to earth. Imagine a place where ice cream never drips. Just about every culture on the planet has its own forms, yet eating in space has been seen, up until now, as a colossal mistake. And even if it does melt, the same forces that bind liquid molecules to each other and allow insects, like water striders, to float and stride on a water surface on Earth will keep ice cream in place in space. Chile Chocolate Sicilian style (no ice cream machine required), Making ice cream without ice cream machine, In October 2012, Commander Sunita Williams of the International Space Station (ISS) even made a special point about how much the crew was looking forward to enjoying the ice cream that just had arrived by capsule, Rhubarb yoghurt ice cream – the eternal summer favourite, Ice cream for vegans, allergics and diabetics, From “ices” to “ice cream” – China, the Orient and the European Renaissance. “Ice cream itself is actually pretty ideal for space. Astronauts don't actually eat it. I have not been able to find anything indicating that the  Soviet authorities ever included ice cream in any of those, though. Little risk for premature defrosting there, in other words. But if you want a whiff of the early space trips, do explore the never-melting Astronaut ice cream (and appreciate the joy of today’s astronauts who actually can enjoy real ice cream instead). In History & Culture, Science & Nature, Space / 3 July 2018, NASA astronaut Scott Kelly gives the “high sign” on the quality of his snack while taking a break from his work schedule aboard the International Space Station on Apr. Ice Cream Riddles Space Riddles. Although astronaut ice cream was originally developed under contract to NASA for the 1968 Apollo 7 mission, there are scarce details on whether it actually flew on its supposed one and only mission to space. “If you’re eating an ice cream cone on a hot day ice cream drips along the cone and down your hand. Hint: In floats! The temperature aboard the space station is kept at around 75 degrees [Fahrenheit], and so you could imagine it might take longer for it to melt there than if you were eating it outside on a hot day,” Levasseur says. In other words, the flavours come from the laboratory, rather than from the garden, if you get my drift. Ironically, it only made one real appearance in space, in 1968. Astronaut Sunita Williams tweeted this photo of herself from October 2012 aboard the International Space Station enjoying a cup of ice cream. Ps. Crumbs flew everywhere in microgravity and could have floated into the astronauts’ eyes or into electrical panels, where they could have caused problems. This is one reason why the famous crumbly, chalky, freeze-dried astronaut ice cream that children devour on Earth is not actually eaten in space. Worse still –  most astronauts did not even care much for the taste! By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Crumbly items like bread can be life-threatening in space. We use cookies in order to give you the best possible experience on our website. “My suspicion is that it was probably tested for Apollo 7 and the astronauts got a chance to try it out before the mission to see if they liked it,” Levasseur says. Powered by  - Designed with the Hueman theme. The loss of gravity means that most things tend to start floating around. You know astronaut ice cream? Bread is among the most widely eaten foods in the world. In preparation for the early manned space-missions, NASA had commissioned proposals for various freeze-dried snacks to bring into space and enrich the eating experience. How do martians eat their ice creams in space? Freeze-dried ready-to-eat ice cream has long been a popular item sold in the museum shop of the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum. As it turned out, the crumbles created a hassle and the crew did not even like the ice cream very much …. A trusty test panel of myself and the kids had a go at a package. Your email address will not be published. Our conversation has been edited for length and clarity. In 1973, the first  “normal ice cream”  was enjoyed aboard the US space station Skylab. In conclusion, good ice cream continues to be best enjoyed in a non-freeze-dried state. [read more about vanilla, this often dismissed but fascinating flavour here]. I spoke with Kloeris about eating in space, how to pack food for a mission to Mars, and the myth of astronaut ice cream. And it's just like the astronauts eat. But the iconic Astronaut ice cream was actually only used once, in 1968. Astronauts on the space station have eaten traditional ice cream that was delivered as "bonus food". Our verdict? In conclusion, good ice cream continues to be best enjoyed in a non-freeze-dried state. The temperature aboard the space station is kept at around 75 degrees [Fahrenheit], and so you could imagine it might take longer for it to melt there than if you were eating it outside on a hot day,” … This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. It wouldn’t necessarily work that way in space,” explains Jennifer Levasseur, curator at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum. This can cause astronauts digestive discomfort and, as a result, Coke and Sprite remain on the ground. Dictionary captures traditional ice knowledge of the Inupiaq people of Wales, Alaska, Female “spidernaut” settles into new home at Smithsonian’s Insect Zoo, Shrinking Moon Linked to Earth’s Tidal Forces. And we all know that astronauts enjoy those packs with freeze-dried ice cream, right? The US space station Skylab: in 1973, this was the place to be for humans craving ‘real’ ice cream in space, Yes, correct!