[3]. But this was not the case for Diogenes. Not only was this man seen as a brilliant general and ruler, but he was even viewed as a literal god by some, as many believed he was the son of Zeus. The Alexander of the story is not the king of kings, ruler of Greece and Asia, but the promising but brash 20-year-old son of Philip of Macedon, first proving his mettle in Greece. [3][15] A. M. Pizzagalli suggests that the account has its origins in the meeting between Alexander and the Gymnosophists in India, and was handed down in Buddhist circles. Alexander wanted to fulfill a wish for Diogenes and asked him what he desired. You’re in my way.”. "[10] The statement by Alexander, "if I were not Alexander the Great, I would like to be Diogenes," also crops up in some other versions of the anecdote. “Stand out of my light.”, the modern day equivalent of “Move. While I’m sure we can all imagine the countless options running through our mind I’m sure we can agree that our answer would not come immediately. Its hard to really encapsulate the weight of his reputation because we have nothing that compares to it in the present day. At 6.60, D.L. [12][13] The other major accounts of the tale are Cicero Tusculanae Disputationes 5.32.92; Valerius Maximus Dictorum factorumque memorabilium 4.3. ext. The most popular relate it as evidence of Diogenes' disregard for honor, wealth, and respect. One of Diogenes' pupils, Onesicritus, later joined Alexander and will have been the original source of this story, embellished in the retelling, which appears in Ptolemy (14.2),[clarification needed] Arrian, (Anabasis Alexandri, 7.2.1) and "Plutarch" Moralia, 331. Frankly that last title is a bit controversial, as some well respected philosopher (such as Hegel) saw his writings as little more than a summation of previously established ideas. Lynch points out the problem that Alexander did not have the title given to him until after he had left Greece, and considers this enough of a problem with the anecdote such that it (alongside the notion that Diogenes lived in a barrel) should be "banish[ed …] from the domain of history". However whenever I let the invasive notion that I’m nothing more than an inconvenience creep in, I think back to that time that a biographer told a near god to get out of his way, and suddenly I don’t feel to bad about waiting for the right moment to make a left turn out of my subdivision. has a third version of the anecdote, with Alexander responding that he is "a good thing" to an inquiry by Diogenes. [3][16], There are significant variations of fact amongst the accounts. Learn to love the mundane days of your relationship. The journey that gave birth to your daily coffee. On top of that he has often been criticized as a biographer for being too focused on trivial details of his subjects lives. That moment in which we ensure that our presence is as small as possible, to make room for the ego of the other person. He spent the majority of his 20’s on a vast conquest in which he conquered all of the land from Greece to Northern India. Plutarch and Diogenes Laërtius report that Alexander and Diogenes died on the same day, in 323 BC. Personally I’d need at least 10 minutes before I could whittle it down to three options. While Diogenes was laying down sunbathing, Alexander the great walked in front of him and offered to grant him one wish. At 6.38 there is Alexander's request and Diogenes's "Stand out of my light!" [5] According to the version recounted by Diogenes Laërtius, Diogenes replied "Stand out of my light. At 6.68, D.L. [2] Although this coincidence is suspect (it possibly being an invention), the anecdote, and the relationship between the two people, has been the subject of many literary and artistic works over the centuries, from the writings of Diogenes Laërtius to David Pinski's 1930 dramatic reconstruction of the encounter, Aleḳsander un Dyogenes; including writings from the Middle Ages, several works of Henry Fielding, and possibly even Shakespeare's King Lear along the way. The meeting of Diogenes of Sinope and Alexander the Great is one of the most well-discussed anecdotes from philosophical history. All too often in our day to day lives we allow powerful people to make us feel smaller. "I am Diogenes the dog.". Versions upon versions of the anecdote exist, with the origins of most appearing to be, either directly or indirectly, in the account of the meeting given by Plutarch, whose actual historicity has also been questioned. In spite of all of this Alexander the Great still seemed to have a certain affinity for Diogenes, as one day he approached him with an offer. "[C]onsidering what rich materials so peculiar a person as Diogenes must have afforded for amusing stories," he continues, "we need not wonder if a few have come down to us of somewhat doubtful genuineness.". According to legend, Alexander the Great came to visit the Greek philosopher Diogenes of Sinope. [5], In his biography of Alexander, Robin Lane Fox[11] sets the encounter in 336, the only time Alexander was in Corinth. By the age of 30 Alexander the great had amassed one of the largest empires ever known, and not through diplomatic relations. Further, as noted earlier, Diogenes Laërtius' rendition of the account is broken up into two parts. Success has been defined as doing what one really wants to do, and in the story of Diogenes and Alexander, Highet compares two personalities who meet under peculiar circumstances. Initially this may seem like a tale that merely emphasizes the vanity of Diogenes, and yeah it certainly does that. The legendary leader of Macedonia has at least a chapter dedicated to him in every history book. Nonetheless it’s important to understand just how intimidating Alexander’s presence was for the context of the story. The literature and artwork is extensive. "[7] It is said that Alexander was so struck by this, and admired so much the haughtiness and grandeur of the man who had nothing but scorn for him, that he said to his followers, who were laughing and jesting about the philosopher as they went away, "But truly, if I were not Alexander, I would be Diogenes. According to Cicero, Diogenes answered Alexander with the words, "Now move at least a little out of the sun"[9] According to Valerius Maximus, Diogenes answered: "To this later, for now I just want you not to stand in the sun. When we accidentally find ourselves in the way of some powerful individual and instantly apologize for the inconvenience. Men came from all parts of the land to see him and talk to him. "[8], There are many minor variants of what Diogenes is supposed to have replied to Alexander. Diogenes was a Greek philosopher while Alexander the great was the lordly ruler of the Greek empire. Diogenes Lartius was a biographer and philosopher in ancient Greece. And when that monarch addressed him with greetings, and asked if he wanted anything, "Yes," said Diogenes, "stand a little out of my sun. [3] Several of the embellished versions of the anecdote do not name either one or both of the protagonists, and some indeed substitute Socrates for Diogenes. What Repeated 8-hour Drives Did for My Relationship. Some have Diogenes and Alexander meeting at Corinth, some in Athens, and some at the Metroön. So when you hear the title ‘Greek Philosopher’, understand that he was exactly rivaling Aristotle. According to Cicero, Diogenes answered Alexander with the words, "Now move at least a little out of the sun"[9] According to Valerius Maximus, Diogenes answered: "To this later, for now I just want you not to stand in the sun. "[10] The statement by Alexander, "if I were not Alexander the Great, I would like to be Diogenes," also crops up in some other versions of the anecdote. While Diogenes was laying down sunbathing, Alexander the great walked in front of him and offered to grant him one wish. Diogenes came to Athens where he met Antisthenes who at first refused him as a student but, eventually, was worn down by his persistence and accepted him. Diogenes was a strange man. Alexander's Campaign > Diogenes and Alexander. A rather rude statement, one that the more mild mannered of us would never say in general, let alone when speaking to the most powerful man in the world. By Andrew Michael Chugg . Many versions of it exist. On the other hand while many of you may be familiar with Diogenes, he is certainly less widespread. Rather than pondering the countless options in front of him, he responded with on terse reply, “Stand out of my light.” Immediately the friends of Alexander began to snicker, as they thought for sure those would be the final words Diogenes ever spoke. The Relationship Between Alexander And Diogenes . The most powerful man in the known world, a near god, offers a much less prestigious individual one gift. or. How Alexander Became A God. [14], The historicity of the accounts by Plutarch and others has been questioned, not least by G. E. Lynch in his article on Diogenes in the Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology. But since that philosopher took not the slightest notice of Alexander, and continued to enjoy his leisure in the suburb Craneion, Alexander went in person to see him; and he found him lying in the sun.