Learning how to play the guitar is as simple as mastering a few basic chords. This is the way most people prefer to play C Major. D Major In all chord examples, the small gray numbers on the accompanying diagrams illustrate which fingers on your fretting hand should be used to play each note. Another chord you come across every day, the E major chord is fairly straightforward to play. Don't forget to curl your third finger on the second string or the first string won't ring properly. It consists of D, F#, and A, and has three variations you'll be learning off the bat. Now, if you're ready to "get cooking," let's dive in and start learning those chords. You can take lessons locally or online. Once you have it under your belt, though, you can use it in cool tunes like "Welcome to the Jungle.". Make sure your first finger (holding down the first fret on the third string) is properly curled or the open second string won't ring properly. By ‘more advanced’ we mean chords that go slightly beyond the basic major, minor and seventh chords that most beginner guitarists know. Don't forget to practice moving from chord to chord slowly at first, then use your metronome to speed your progress. C Major Which chords should you start with, though, if you're a beginner player? 1) A Major. Avoid playing the open sixth string when strumming the A minor chord. Want to see the instructors near you? F Major can be a tricky chord for beginners to learn. A Minor comes with a few basic variations (three to be precise), but your easiest version will come to you quickly, and will serve as a simple chord to transition to from C Major. Basic Guitar Chords Basic Guitar Chords (for Beginners). E Major Learn the Basic Guitar Chords step-by-step with these easy lessons. Like E Major, E Minor has a very easy variant, along with several challenging variants. This is simplicity at it's finest. I call them beginner guitar chords, but they are used everyday by beginners as well as advanced players and in all styles of music.Beginners should practice these chords until they have memorized them and are able to switch between them fluidly. G Major plays a role in popular songs like "Sweet Home Alabama" and "Ring of Fire.". Conclusion. The C major chord (also known as the C chord) is often the first chord guitarists learn. A Major C major. As you learn these, remember to observe the proper technique and take time to practice. Sometimes, it makes sense to play a G major chord using your third finger on the sixth string, your second finger on the fifth string, and your fourth (pinky) finger on the first string. You can add a bit of spice by placing your 3rd finger on the 1st string/3rd fret, but in this form, the chord is as easy as pie. It starts with simple songs with only C and G open chords, then adds one new chord at a … Your variations will only get trickier from here. Download the Basic Guitar Chords Chart Printable PDF. There are situations when it makes sense to reverse your second and third fingers when playing the E major chord. To mix it up, try placing your 4th finger on the 1st string/5th fret for this one as well. There are situations when it makes sense to reverse your second and third fingers when playing the A minor chord. Easy guitar chords are essential for beginner guitarists, but they can be strangely hard to find online. This is arguably the most common chord of all-time. As with most chords in this list, a clear G major chord depends on curling your first finger so the open fourth string rings clearly. This is the C major chord, or the C … In closing, I'd like to draw attention to chord memorization and transitions. Strum only on beat 1 of each measure. The C major chord (also known as the C chord) is often the first chord guitarists learn. That's the legend, but regardless of its veracity, you'll be able to use this chord in more than just the National Anthem. Make sure your first finger is curled, so the open first string rings clearly. There are multiple ways to play each chord, but we'll be sticking to the most common variations. F Major Let’s break down these essential chords in sections to make it more digestible. A Minor. In certain situations, it may make sense to reverse your finger position so that your second finger is on the fifth string, and your third finger is on the fourth string. The next few variations will require some interesting fingering, and may test your dexterity. The notes for this chord are E, G, and B, and you may well have heard it while listening to "Come As You Are." Place your 1st finger on the 5th string/2nd fret, Place your 2nd finger on the 6th string/3rd fret, Place your 3rd finger on the 1st string/3rd fret, Place your 3rd finger on the 2nd string/3rd fret, Place your 4th finger on the 1st string/3rd fret, Use finger one to hold down strings 1 and 2 on the 3rd fret, Place your 2nd finger on the 3rd string 4th fret, Place your 3rd finger on the 4th string 5th fret, Place your 1st finger on the 6th string/3rd fret, Place your 2nd finger on the 2nd string/3rd fret, Place your 3rd finger on the 3rd string/4th fret, Place your 2nd finger on the 3rd string/4th fret, Place your 3rd finger on the 5th string/5th fret, Place your 4th finger on the 4th string/5th fret, Place your 1st finger on the 2nd string/1st fret, Place your 2nd finger on the 4th string/2nd fret, Place your 3rd finger on the 5th string/3rd fret, Place your 4th finger on the 1st string/3rd fret (or mute string 1), Place your 1st finger on the 4th string/2nd fret, Place your 2nd finger on the 5th string/3rd fret, Place your 2nd finger on the 4th string/5th fret, Place your 3rd finger on the 3rd string/5th fret, Place your 4th finger on the 2nd string/5th fret, Place your 1st finger on the 3rd string/2nd fret, Place your 3rd finger on the 1st string/2nd fret, Use your 1st finger to cover strings 1 and 3 on the 2nd fret, Place your 3rd finger on the 4th string/4th fret, Place your 4th finger on the 5th string/5th fret, Place your 1st finger on the 4th string/4th fret, Place your 2nd finger on the 5th string/5th fret, Place your 3rd finger on the 1st string/5th fret, Use your 1st finger to cover strings 1 and 2 on the 1st fret, Place your 2nd finger on the 3rd string/2nd fret, Place your 3rd finger on the 4th string/3rd fret, Place your 1st finger on the 4th string/3rd fret, Place your 4th finger on the 1st string/5th fret, Place your first finger on the 6th string/1st fret, Place your 2nd finger on the 2nd string/2nd fret, Place your 3rd finger on the 3rd string/3rd fret, Place your 4th finger on the 4th string/3rd fret, Place your 1st finger on the 3rd string/1st fret, Place your 2nd finger on the 5th string/2nd fret, Place your 3rd finger on the 4th string/2nd fret, Place your 2nd finger on the 5th string/2nd fret (optional), Place your 4th finger on the 1st string/4th fret, Play string 6 open (or mute strings 5 and 6), Place your first finger on the 4th string/2nd fret, Place your 3rd finger on the 1st string/4th fret, Place your 2nd finger on the 3rd string/3rd fret, Place your 1st finger on the 5th string/4th fret, Place your 2nd finger on the 6th string/5th fret, Place your 3rd finger on the 2nd string/5th fret, Place your 3rd finger on the 4th string/5th fret, Use your 1st finger to cover strings 4 and 5 on the 2nd fret, Place your 2nd finger on the 1st string/3rd fret, Place your 3rd finger on the 3rd string/2nd fret, Place your 3rd finger on the 6th string/5th fret, Place your 4th finger on the 3rd string/4th fret.