The most common mic for a snare drum is the trusty Shure SM57. Here are a couple ideas to get you going: Example 2: X-Y, Kick, and Snare Derived from a setup that we have gone over and modified. The overhead and side mic are positioned an equal distance from the snare drum, keeping the stereo image of the kit intact, while also ensuring that the sound hits both mic capsules at the same time, while the bass drum mic adds the low end of the kick drum. We currently just mic the kick but the issue is the room we often play in is very live, so we get alot of natural cymbal reverb. Stage Sub-Snakes Utilizing stage sub-snakes before going to the main stage snake will keep the cable clutter on stage to a minimum. If this scheme takes up too many channels, just one mic in the kick drum will still help to bolster the live mix. For a good small room, I prefer to mic the kick drum, as well as the snare. In order to deliver the best-sounding mix, you need to take stock of what you can hear in the room naturally, without amplification. It's not as simple as placing a mic on each drum and two more above the kit, and bringing up the faders. Actually, the combination of the two of these - one kick mic and one overhead shaded toward the snare and hat - is really a fine way to mic a drum set in anything less than the best conditions (i.e. Because the snare drum is located so close to the other drums, especially the hi-hats, a cardioid pattern mic is a must. Most drum kits, in a small room, won't need any amplification past the kick drum. The mic is generally placed between the hi-hats and the small tom-tom about 1 or 2 inches from the snare drum … It takes work. Ok so I need a fairly easy to setup and minimal drum micing solution, for live purposes. Drums are a difficult thing to mix live. It takes awareness and understanding of how the sound propagates from the drum and out through the room, and how the mics respond to that phenomenon. Three Mic Drum Setup teamsignaturesound January 15, 2011 Recording Techniques 0 Comments A quick and simple way to setup a drum kit with three microphones would be to simply add a snare microphone to any of the two microphones methods mentioned before. long sound check, top quality PA, different people mixing monitors and FOH) Very simple to set up … Quadruple Mic Setup: Out of all the “simple” drum miking techniques, you get the most flexibility when you are able to use four microphones. A drum kit may have 8 to 12 microphones set up to capture the sound, so a dedicated sub-snake allows for shorter mic-cable runs and a much cleaner stage setup.